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Early German Concertinas

The following photos are courtesy of Harry Geuns, a free reed instrument maker in the Netherlands, and Stephen Chambers of Dublin Ireland.

Uhlig's first concertina in 1834 was square in shape and had 5 buttons on each side.  Each button produced two different tones depending on the direction of the bellows, for a total of 20 tones. 

20 tone Konzertina (from about 1854).  In the collection of Stephen Chambers.  Photo courtesy of Stephen Chambers.

 

By 1840, Uhlig had increased the number of tones on his concertina to 56 tones (26 buttons).  This concertina is from about 1860.

In the collection of Stephen Chambers.  Photo courtesy of Stephen Chambers.

Uhlig eventually produced concertinas with 60, 64, and 76 tones.  This Concertina has 76 tones.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

M.Friedel 96 tone Chemnitzer Concertina

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

E.Haustein 102 tone Chemnitzer Concertina.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

Lange 76 tone Chemnitzer Concertina

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

ELA 102 tone Chemnitzer Concertina.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

Bruno Notzel 96 tone Carlsfelder Keyboard Concertina.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

Kurt Jobst Chemnitzer Concertina

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

Kurt Hartig 96 tone Carlsfelder Concertina.  Note the metal ends.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

August Arnold 96 tone Carlsfelder Concertina.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

Eduard Haustein 1910 Chemnitzer Concertina.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

Kurt Hartig 96 tone Carlsfelder Concertina.

In the collection of Harry Geuns.  Photo courtesy of Harry Geuns.

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All contents Copyright Daniel Melander